Gardening

Types of fruit giving trees in london

Types of fruit giving trees in london



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Types of fruit giving trees in london

The more you plant the more you get. Planting fruit trees in London will help you enjoy eating fresh, ripe fruit throughout the year. Planting fruit trees in London has never been easier! We have selected the following trees to help you begin your quest to eat fresh fruit all year round.

Our fruit tree seeds are delivered direct from the growers, you can expect high quality, competitively priced and germinate in a matter of days.

You may also enjoy our range of seed-starting kits which are a fast, convenient and highly effective way to get your own plants off to a great start.

The more trees you plant the more fruit you will be able to enjoy throughout the year.

Pome fruits

Pome fruits such as apples, pears and quince are one of the easiest fruit trees to grow in London. The best way to start off is to purchase pome fruit trees in pots or individual containers. If you live in an area where heavy frost is a problem, pome fruit trees will appreciate an unheated greenhouse or polytunnel to protect them from temperature fluctuations. A soil-based compost should be incorporated as soon as you have moved your pome fruit trees into the garden. The soil may be too acidic or acidic soil may not be ideal for pome fruit trees, so be sure to select a potting mix that is suitable for your trees. Alternatively, you can repot your pome fruit trees in a container with good drainage.

To ensure that your pome fruit trees are ready for a few years of fruiting before you will need to re-pot them, prune them in early spring before they have grown significantly. This will help to improve the shape of your pome fruit trees, increase the size of your fruit and reduce the number of pest problems. You should cut your pome fruit trees back to about two-thirds of their current size. A summer mulch, such as compost, will help to retain moisture. Keep an eye out for disease and pests, which should be treated as and when you see any problems.

Pome fruits have a long season of fruit-bearing from mid- to late spring into summer and autumn into winter. Fruiting in warm weather is good, as this will lengthen the life of your trees. The fruit is best harvested and used within 2 to 4 weeks after picking. The best way to store pome fruit is in the refrigerator.

Pear fruits

Like pome fruits, pear trees are also one of the easiest fruit trees to grow in London.

When you select your pear trees, make sure you choose varieties that are suitable for your climate. For example, if your climate is wet and/or windy, choose varieties that have very low cold hardiness. The ideal temperature for fruit growth is above 10°C and if you live in an area where there is heavy frost in winter, you will not want to have your trees exposed to this temperature. The climate of your area will affect the size of your pears. For example, my pear trees are happy to be in a sheltered and warm area in the south-east of London but would not do well in a northerly wind.

Pears are a year-round fruit, so you can plant them throughout the year. You can even start your pears in December. In winter, protect your trees from damaging winds and cold temperatures. The pears will be heavy with blossom in early spring. You can expect to begin to pick pears from these trees in early to mid-spring. When you harvest your pears, they should be stored in a cool place, preferably in the refrigerator.

Saving fruit for the winter months is usually necessary because pears are not great when fresh and are best when used in preserves and marmalades. It is also useful to try to harvest your fruit the same time each year so that you will be able to start your winter preparations in April or May and have your fruits in store until December.

## **APPLES**

Like pears, apples are a year-round fruit and will grow in any climate, so be prepared to take some chances. I grow three varieties of apple – a cling-type, a muskmelon and a late-ripening variety called Kingston Black. If you are going to plant an apple orchard, you must make sure that the type of apple that you grow is the one that you really like. Growing just one type of apple in your orchard can look rather dull and you will then have to struggle to persuade yourself to go out to your apple trees in late autumn and take their fruit off them.

Some apples can be trained to grow in an avenue. If you want to grow your own fruit, you need to know the type of apples that are appropriate for that type of tree.For example, we have apple trees in our garden that are trained to grow in a V-shape and it would be impossible to train an apple tree to grow in that manner. But we also have a small apple tree that we trained to grow in a circle. I have used the same apples in both types of trees but trained them differently. On a V-shaped tree, I leave the lower branches on the V-trunk and cut out some of the lower branches that I don't need. If the tree is a small one, I cut out more of the lower branches. On the tree trained to grow in a circle, I cut out the lower branches but leave the trunk and the top branches intact. I need only a few branches from that tree to feed my family. This is all done as late as I can because the new growth is so soft and flexible that it will break easily.

The same rules apply to growing your own fruit. Leave lower branches intact. If the tree is a small one, you don't need to remove any of the lower branches. And you need to have enough to feed your family, so make sure you have enough before training the tree to grow in a circle.

### **Using the Apple Trees**

**_To harvest, cut the apples at a slant, keeping them firm, then place them in a container._**

**_Cut the apple in two, or into quarters, depending on the size. Make sure it's firm before you cut it._**

**_To make applesauce, wash, peel, core, and thinly slice the apples. Cook for 10 minutes at a slow boil._**

**_To make applesauce and apple butter, wash, peel, core, and thinly slice the apples. Mix them with sugar, water, lemon juice, or white wine, and cook the mixture for 10 minutes._**

**_To make apple sauce, wash, peel, core, and thinly slice the apples. Mix them with sugar, water, lemon juice, and apple cider vinegar, then cook for 10 minutes._**

**_To make apple chutney, wash, peel, core, and thinly slice the apples. Mix them with lemon juice, sugar, and spices._**

**_To make apple butter, wash, peel, core, and thinly slice the apples. Mix them with sugar, water, lemon juice, or white wine, and cook the mixture for 10 minutes._**

**_To make apple pie filling, wash, peel, core, and thinly slice the apples. Mix them with sugar, water, and lemon juice, then cook the mixture for 10 minutes._**

### **Using the Honey Trees**

**_In late fall, dig up the young roots with your bare hands. Remove the root from the dirt. Separate the